SLAVE ANCESTRY RESEARCH Will of Thomas WINGFIELD ~ 27 December 1797

PAGE I
Thomas WINGFIELD Will - Page I
PAGES II & III
Thomas WINGFIELD Will - Pags II & III

It dawned on me if Family Search had digitized Wilkes County Inventories, Appraisements and Sales, there was a good chance I’d find the will of Thomas WINGFIELD too! BINGO! Executed December 27, 1797 the will of Thomas WINGFIELD Sr. in WILKES County, GA.

Surprised to find more WINGFIELD slaves being willed to Thomas’ heirs and wife, Elizabeth. Makes sense though, this is why the first estate inventory I located only had household goods for sale. The second division of slaves, identified the slaves originally willed to Thomas’ wife in 1797 and due to her death in 1802, are being allotted to their children — per the directive in his will.

Thanks to Family Search, looks like my days of chasing probate court records down might be behind me! Well done FS! — Luckie

Heirs and 29 Slaves named in 1797 will of Thomas WINGFIELD:

Sam WINGFIELD

  • Daniel
  • Indey

Molley WINGFIELD

  • Milley with all her increase
    • Lily
    • Tempey
    • Rodey *

Thomas WINGFIELD

  • Thornton
  • Jenny

John WINGFIELD

  • James
  • Edmund
  • Abram
  • Ealey
  • Nancy

Charles WINGFIELD

  • Emmanuel
  • Davey
  • Martha

Fanney WINGFIELD

  • Phillis
    • Kizzy
  • Solomon
  • Johan *

Elizabeth WINGFIELD – Wife

  • ?
  • Charles
  • Joe
  • Nat
  • Patience
  • Venus
  • Suck
  • Silvey *
  • Mary

* indicates possible transcription and/or misspelling

Related Posts:

SLAVE ANCESTRY RESEARCH: 1803 Division of Thomas WINGFIELD Slaves a Historical GAMECHANGER!

Thomas WINGFIELD - Division of Ancestors

In 1783 Thomas WINGFIELD (b. 1745 – d. 1797) of HANOVER County, VA migrated to WILKES County, GA to claim land awarded for his Revolutionary War service. Migrating with WINGFIELD were my first 23 Wilkes County Ancestors.

Upon WINGFIELD’s death in 1797 my Ancestors were willed to his heirs and wife, Elizabeth NELSON WINGFIELD on December 27 1797. Elizabeth WINGFIELD died in 1802. The slaves originally willed to Elizabeth by Thomas, were allotted to their children in 1803 in the following division of slaves:

Samuel WINGFIELD (Overseer) — Lot 1 ($645)

  • Charles – $300
  • Mary – $345

Thomas WINGFIELD Jr. — Lot 2 ($865)

  • Joe – $395
  • Venus – $320
  • Jordan – $93
  • Washington -$57

Frances WINGFIELD — Lot 3 ($554)

  • Charles * – $355
  • James * – $205
  • Patsey – $94

Charles WINGFIELD — Lot 4 ($478)

  • Suck – $320
  • William – $121
  • Young Child – $27

John WINGFIELD (Father of James Nelson, owner of my 4th Grandfather James WINGFIELD) — Lot 5 ($522)

  • Nate – $285
  • Amy – $205
  • Lucy – $102

John BUTLER * — Lot 6 ($551)

  • Pal— * – $270
  • Sylvia  – $260
  • Lucy – $46
  • Margaret – $75

Though I knew all African American, Wilkes County WINGFIELDS descended from Thomas’ sons, I never had any idea of how the sorting happened. Now we know — the first parsing of WINGFIELD slaves occurred in

The Bar IS NOT Budging. So Now What?!

Henderson Washington GAI planned to pen this post for private viewing by my AAGSAR Facebook Community only, but I do favor transparency. So that said, this post is available to anyone having interest to read it.

As I shared with AAGSAR this morning, this has been a tough week. As we near our 2014 BLOGFEST event, the first step in preparing has been the work of removing inactive members from the forum. Not a warm n’ fuzzy task at all!:)

Why are inactive members removed from AAGSAR? Read here — AAGSAR Official CHEAT SHEET: Surviving The Principal, TRIBE & 21st Century Slave Ancestry Research.

Members are NEVER happy to exit the forum and some are more “vocal” than others. My reaction to the commentary is usually a mix of surprise, frustration and sadness. Though specific to the transition our Community is making, the responses expose cultural and emotional wounds that feel set on historic rewind. As I shared with Liv of Claiming Kin, we are the only people I’ve worked with who no matter what, fight AGAINST progress and deem anyone attempting to make it, the enemy.

So I’m publishing a behind the scenes exchange between myself and a member who requested to be removed from the community this morning. I think it speaks […]

SLAVE ANCESTRY RESEARCH: WINGFIELD WHITLOCK Bible Slave Names, Births, Deaths ~ Hanover, VA

Admittedly, I’m not the traditional Thanksgiving Day observer. As I sit here tonight, relaxing after enjoying movies and junk food with the kids, my mind landed on the WINGFIELD WHITLOCK Slave Ancestors of Virginia. Connected to my family line, I have no idea how much of their bloodline departed Hanover VA with Thomas WINGFIELD in 1783 in-route to Washington-Wilkes GA. 23 Slave Ancestors counted as WINGFIELD’s property are evidence my lineage didn’t begin in 1783 Wilkes County GA, so I can certainly count among these souls DNA Ancestors.

DNA connections don’t really matter much tonight. On a day when we traditionally draw family close, my Ancestors deserve a home here, among kin who shared common experiences and a descendant doing all she can to restore and preserve their legacy.

Slave names and data transcribed here are in alphabetical order accompanied by the names of slaves from the wills of Thomas WINGFIELD (1837) and Martha WHITLOCK (1825).

Peace and ease WINGFIELD WHITLOCK Ancestors. Thankful to have you home.

Luckie

WINGFIELD WHITLOCK Bible ~ Page 2

WINGFIELD WHITLOCK Bible ~ Page 3

WINGFIELD WHITLOCK Bible ~ Page 4

23andMe: DNA Results Provide ANSWERS & Leave Even More QUESTIONS!

23andme Luckie Daniels ~ EXPANDED

So after 7.5 weeks of patiently waiting my 23andme DNA sample results are FINALLY in! Woooo-hooooo!:)

From my mtDNA (Maternal Line) results it appears I’m 87.5% Sub-Saharan African, 11% European, 1.4% East Asian & Native American and .1% unassigned — which I assume to mean alien, or we don’t know exactly what that is!:)

My Haplogroup is L2a1 (see 23andme details below)
Maternal haplogroups are families of mitochondrial DNA types that all trace back to a single mutation at a specific place and time. By looking at the geographic distribution of mtDNA types, we learn how our ancient female ancestors migrated throughout the world.

  • Haplogroup: L2a, a subgroup of L2
  • Age: 55,000 years
  • Region: Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Example Populations: Bantu-speakers, African Americans
  • Highlight: L2 is very common among African Americans

Catie WINGFIELD-DORSEYWERE THERE ANY SURPRISES?

  • In respect to my European makeup — NOPE! On my Maternal side (WILKES County GA) I had several CARTER Ancestors who passed for white following Emancipation and have been told my 4th Grandfather Philip CARTER had white skin and blue eyes. Additionally, judging by the relatives — and offspring — of my other WILKES 4th Grandfather James WINGFIELD, I think it’s safe to assume he was of fair complexion as well. From my Alabama Roots, 4th Grandparents Cary and Ann BARWICK are both identified as mulatto on the 1870 HENRY County Census. So no shocker as […]

SLAVE ANCESTRY RESEARCH: Plantation Ledger of Samuel WINGFIELD 1772-1820

Samuel WINGFIELD ~ Plantation LedgerSamuel WINGFIELD 1772-1820 was the son of Thomas WINGFIELD and Elizabeth NELSON, the planter and Revolutionary War soldier who brought my first Ancestors to WILKES County, GA in 1783.

I’ve never seen an image of Samuel WINGFIELD. The researcher in me will certainly head to the WINGFIELD Family Society to see what additional information I can turn up as a lead to more Ancestors.

What I do know about Samuel WINGFIELD is he was Overseer to my Ancestors on the WINGFIELD and Ralph WORMELEY Plantations. A meticulous record keeper, evident by 300 Plantation Ledger pages that with great, heartbreaking detail, tell the story of what work life was like for my WILKES County Ancestors.

I have no plans to publish WINGFIELD’s ledger on Our Georgia Roots. There’s NOTHING in me that wants to give it life ever again. I don’t want to be tempted to understand what its formulas, word problems and complex equations truly represented.

I could study the ledger a lifetime, and NEVER understand the ability of a human being to calculate the value of another human being to be the equivalent of a work-mule.

Though I find no value in publishing the Plantation Ledger, I do believe they are artifacts descendants of Enslaved Ancestors need to see. I would encourage family historians to make an effort to identify and research these rare, but genealogically value documents.

I’ve included below the

SLAVE ANCESTRY RESEARCH: WINGFIELD Slave Owners Genealogy & Crop Data

Wingfield-Genealogy---CurationIn 2004 I discovered a Special Collection of slave related artifacts belonging to Thomas WINGFIELD curated by Duke University.

According to 1782 HANOVER County VA tax records, Thomas WINGFIELD’s household consisted of 9 family members and 23 slaves. For WINGFIELD’s Revolutionary War service, he received a land grant of 200 acres, migrating to WILKES County GA in 1783.

The 23 Slaves migrating with Thomas WINGFIELD were my original Virginia Ancestors. Pretty darn phenomenal huh?!

This past Saturday, I drove 2.5 hours from Charlotte to the Duke University Rubenstein Rare Document & Manuscript Library to view the collection in person!:)

The WINGFIELD Collection isn’t the first slave owner collection I’ve discovered.

In 2009 I found the Claude Carr CODY Collection housed at Southwestern University in TX. A MASSIVE collection of personal documents belonging to Claude’s Father Madison Derelle CODY, a slave owner of my WARREN County Ancestors. Excited, I hired an onsite researcher to identify documents relevant to my research. Roughly 1 week later we realized the unthinkable — EVERY slave related document belonging to Madison CODY had be meticulously omitted. There wasn’t one, single mention of my Ancestors anywhere.

Devastated is the only word to even come close to how I felt. So though excited to finally touch the WINGFIELD collection, I was careful to hold my excitement in check.

Though much smaller, the historical information contained within the WINGFIELD Collection is far richer than anything I would have expected!

So what did I discover?

SENTIMENTAL SUNDAY: An Early WINGFIELD Thanksgiving Full of Grace & Ancestors

My prayer, may your names FOREVER be called. I pay homage to my WINGFIELD Ancestors. Ashe-O!

 Martha & Children WINGFIELD

Martha & Children

Ancestors RICHARD & MORIAH

Richard & Moriah

Ancestors WINGFIELD 1780 - 1797

WINGFIELD Ancestors 1780-1797

Ancestors-WINGFIELD 1799 - 1820

WINGFIELD Ancestors 1799-1820

Ancestors WINGFIELD 18?? -- 1862

WINGFIELD Ancestors 18??-1862

Ancestors-WINGFIELD-V

WINGFIELD Ancestors List of Negroes Ages 1848-1859

Ancestors-WINGFIELD-VI

WINGFIELD Ancestors List of Negroes Ages 1794-1832

Ancestors-WINGFIELD-VII

WINGFIELD Ancestors Births 1790-1848

Ancestors-WINGFIELD-VIII

WINGFIELD Ancestors Deaths 1832-1866

Ancestors-WINGFIELD-VI

WINGFIELD Ancestors Births 1859-1907

SLAVE ANCESTRY RESEARCH: I Pay Homage… Martha & Children [WINGFIELD]

After my Duke University, Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library visit today to view the Thomas WINGFIELD Collection, my once enslaved WINGFIELD Ancestors are a lot less mysterious tonight.

I celebrated EVERY Ancestor name I discovered and carried them home with me. There are MANY days of analysis and transcribing ahead, but for tonight I’m just thankful to finally meet Martha and her Children.

I pay homage to my WINGFIELD Ancestors…

A very grateful, Luckie

Source: WINGFIELD Family – Papers, 1772-1907 (bulk 1772-1866) manuscript

Always Reach Out…

James Edward DICKEYI’m in the process of restoring all the archived Our Georgia Roots blog posts, online BEFORE I allowed the domain and hosting to lapse in 2011.

Clearly I’m shortsighted. I never really intended to research again when I walked away in August 2011, and felt , I could live with my research surviving in archives (online) and in binders (with me).

I was wrong on all counts. When Mom passed on 8/5 the Ancestors called me back to the research. And I cannot willfully remove a decade long narrative of the WINGFIELD, CARTER, DORSEY, DICKEY and JACKSON Ancestors from the online genealogy landscape.

Cut and paste is my future until the work is complete!:)

But there’s hope in my effort too. Hope old historical gaps will be filled. Hope the few remaining research hurdles will move aside. Hope in the more to come.

This brings me to the DICKEYS — 1999, 2002, 2009 (twice) and today. Encouraged by my AAGSAR Community and Linda of Between the Gate Posts, I’m reaching out yet again.

My request over the years remains unchanged. I want to know what Rev. James Madison DICKEY wrote in his personal journal and bible regarding his time with my 4th Grandmother Catie. So adding nothing, I repost — Acceptance: No Word From Dickey’s Descendants…

21 August 2009

Well it’s been 3 weeks since I emailed the living descendants of Rev. James Madison DICKEY in a final attempt to encourage them to […]